Afghanistan

As some of you may know from reading this blog, I posted a notice about an event last week for people concerned with the Korean hostages in Afghanistan. I was one of those people that went there feeling like there was very little that could be done.

I don’t know if I walked away from the meeting feeling like there was a clear solution to the situation, but I do feel like I learned a
great deal from some very compassionate people. I walked away with a greater understanding of the role of the Taliban and the moral authority they hold in Afghanistan. I also was reminded of how much the US has been a major factor in shaping the Afghanistan that exists today. And most enlightening of all, I met some folks at the meeting who had volunteered and done aide work multiple times in Afghanistan. And guess what? They had survived. They weren’t kidnapped, starved and shot. And they wish to go back again (probably moreso now than before).

These incredibly generous people made it very clear that the general populace of the country is very invested in not having situations like this happen. And in actuality, the general public in Afghanistan goes out of their way to make sure that foreign volunteers are safe and can continue their work. Why? Because the people of Afghanistan need help. They are in a terrible situation on so many levels.

It really shocked me when I read some of the comments on my previous post that came just short of saying the hostages deserved what they got.

I don’t know if there is much that can be done except pray and hope for their safe return. But if you are concerned, the people at KoreanAmericansNeeded.com have drafted a letter that appeals to the UN and Muslim Leaders to condemn the actions of the Taliban. The hope is that shame will motivate the Taliban to change their plans. Currently, they have twisted the principles of the Islamic faith for their own use. The hail mary play is to hopefully reveal that this is not the will of the people and that the Taliban is no more than a terrorist organization.

There is a petition you can sign here that will show your support. And you can also check out KoreanAmericansNeeded.com to read the letter drafted to the Muslim leaders.

From KoreanAmericansNeeded:

During last Thursday’s briefing on Afghanistan, the main concern seemed to be, “What can we do?”

It was said that given the
history of Afghanistan and the Taliban’s reputation as moral
authorities, that an appeal to their morality, or the teachings of the
Prophet Mohammad in the Quran, may invoke a reaction.

A letter was recently drafted
that is addressed to Governor Marajulldin Pathan of the Ghazni province
in Afghanistan. If he wanted, he could get it into the hands of the
Taliban who are currently holding the Koreans hostage.

This letter was written with the
endorsements of the Afghanistan World Foundation and the Muslim Policy
Affairs Council. The United States, Afghanistan, and Korean government
have all failed to get the hostages released. Not only that, but two
have already lost their lives and another two are in critical
condition. We are asking on a person-to-person basis, not on a
government-person basis, and so we are appealing only to their morality
and their honor which are key values in Islamic teachings and
traditions. Let us all join and hope that this letter will move the
Taliban captors to release the hostages unconditionally so that they
can unite with their beloved families whose suffering right now is
equally as unimaginable.

If this is something that you
believe could make a difference, even in the slightest, then please
mail or email a copy to any of the following requesting that they pass
it on:

UN Ambassadors of Islamic Nations

President and Leaders of Islamic Nations (especially Turkey)

Parliament President of Islamic Nations

Local Media

Government Officials
Your letter will be appreciated
by many people, even ones who never get a chance to read it. Sometimes
it’s the effort that counts. If you have any questions or comments
please contact us at
info@koreanamericansneeded.com

Advertisements

One thought on “

  1. On a tentatively positive note, I did hear yesterday that the Taliban has claimed that they have no intention of killing any more of the 21 remaining hostages. I think (hope) that they realized that killing the hostages was not going to gain them anything. I don’t think they deserved what happened, far from it. I just question how any organization could send people into situations like this without taking precautions that are the norm for the area. And I hope that all groups that want to do good first ensure that the volunteers they send are trained and as protected as they can be. For one thing, it’s really difficult to do good if you’re being held hostage.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s